How to Have a Feminist Christian Wedding

To the first: if you self-identify as that beautifully paradoxical and frustratingly poignant mix of feminist and Christian, AND now you’re planning a wedding, bless you. 

And please know that, contrary to the title, this post is not a one-size-for-all guide. We contain multitudes, and in those multitudes is the very understanding that feminism (and womanism) liberates us to choose, and contain contradictions, and that the elusive “feminist” and “Christian” essence is perhaps so elusive because essentializing anything causes allergic reactions to Jesus and Audre Lorde alike.

Urban South Photo

Photo by the effervescent Urban South Photo!

In August, my cis-male partner and i got married, in a big Southern church, with an exchange of rings and big organ music in the background. I wore white(ish), he a tux, and ordained preachers married us.

That’s about where the tradition ended.

We had a multi-gendered bridal party where my 6’2″ brother held my bouquet; we had a “Blessing of the Families” where all our immediate family laid hands on us, giving us both their blessing instead of giving me away; and Jonathan kicked off the procession with his mother, and both my parents escorted me down the aisle.

Since then, i’ve been asked a lot about how we did it, and here are a few of the big tips i have:

1. Ask supportive people to be a part of your wedding – priests and bridal party alike! We had three officiates who were all amazing feminists. Because they all knew how much we wanted a faithful and feminist wedding, they supported praying to “Our Mother-Father God” and assisted us in finding “biblical marriage” resources from same-gender unions to use in our own. The homily even included some Gene Robinson and Saint Teresa of Avila quotes! As for our multi-gendered bridal party, we were

Chosen Family, by Urban South Photo!

Chosen Family, by Urban South Photo!

careful to ask what people would be comfortable wearing, and we unabashedly loved how uneven and perfect our friends looked surrounding us on the altar. They, too, understood deeply who we are and what we wanted our covenant to look like.

2. Choose your Scriptures thoughtfully. I admit, it baffles me that there are Christian couples who have little to no preference for the Scriptures read at their wedding. It’s easy to get swept up how many mason jar tea lights you need for the reception (guilty) but for us, the ceremony was the centerpiece of our day. Take some time together to think about how the Scriptures you choose reflect the life you want to lead together, and if you want the more traditional Ephesians 5 or 1 Corinthians, take some time to really discuss why. We chose Ruth 1:6 – 18, John 15:1 – 15, and “On Marriage” from The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran. I’ve been to some other amazing weddings that included quotes or passages from Mother Teresa and Bishop Oscar Romero.

2A: If you’re like me, and you simply can’t choose an economic number of readings, try and integrate these extra readings into other parts of the service; for example, we couldn’t quite squeeze Songs of Songs into our readings, so for the Eucharist we used this Great Thanksgiving based on Song of Songs

3. Make use of the resources your church/officiate knows of. We wanted to ensure a number of heteronormative and sexist doctrines were removed from the liturgy of our wedding, so we wrote our own “Statement of Intent” that made reference to Biblical friendship and love (i.e. Ruth and Naomi, Jonathan and David) rather than to Eve being made for Adam as the original two people destined to be hetero-happy forever. Our pastor recommended the Protestant Wedding Sourcebook which was especially helpful for reading through various liturgies, knowing the liturgy had all the good stuff in it – connectedness to the church throughout time, familiarity – but there was flexibility in the language. Also, i always recommend the WATER Womyn’s Alliance as a good place to start with feminist liturgies.

Yellow shoes & true love, by Urban South Photo!

Yellow shoes & true love, by Urban South Photo!

4. Be prepared for the Emily Post fanatics. I refused to address our invitations to any sort of “Mr. and Mrs. Man-name Man-Surname” on principle, choosing instead to say “Mrs. Lady and Mr. Sir LastName” or throwing all convention out the window when it came to the majority LGBTQIA/single friends we invited. (One friend was addressed as the Future Queen of England, on the fancy printed paper and everything.) We also conscientiously chose local businesses and showed a preference for mostly womyn vendors. Wedding can be massive capitalistic consumerist monsters, and while we chose to have the Big White Wedding, we wanted to be as responsible about our spending and financial support as possible. This raised some eyebrows, but on the whole once we sat down and gently explained why, the rule of Our-Day-Our-Rules kicked in. Mostly.

4B: The best piece of logistical advice i got pre-planning was this: sit down, in quiet, and picture your dream wedding. What are the top three most important things to you? Mine were: solidify the covenant with my love before God and surrounded by our community, focus only on getting married and no last minute drama or planning [so make sure other people know the plan for the day], and throw a raucous party that is casual and fun all at once. In the moments where my mother and i inevitably argued over the mason jar tea lights or why i should/should not have to wear a veil, i remembered my list, and let go what i knew she wanted to be in charge of. So when it comes to the social niceties, sometimes it is okay to keep the peace and make small concessions that you don’t feel violate your core values or partnership.

This is true whatever kind of wedding you’re a part of – no matter how much it may be your moment, there’s always someone else who thinks it is theirs. And when it’s your parents or in-laws or friends, try and remember that they love you and are excited for you and just want the day to be perfect – even if their vision of perfection is not, well, yours.

And take some time alone to breathe, and find a friend who won’t judge when you need a good vent session.

5. Breathe. Pray. Take time to remind yourselves why you are doing this ridiculous and beautiful thing called marriage. Especially during the wedding week – try and find time every day to be alone with your love and just hang out, if only for ten minutes.

This is a sacred and wonderful time, and it will be messy and feathers will get ruffled, but your marriage is between you, God, and your partner, and the tea lights are really the least important thing to worry about.

l&j - ceremony-129



Advertisements

5 thoughts on “How to Have a Feminist Christian Wedding

  1. Katie Middleton says:

    I love this post. My partner and I have recently decided to get married and I am keenly trying to discover ways I can make my wedding as gender equal as possible and looking for inspiration on the internet. It also happens that we are having our ceremony in a Catholic Church. Although my partner is agnostic and I am a dubious Catholic, it was still really important to be and fit in with my beliefs as a Catholic to get married in my church. BUT FEMINISM! A lot of the things you’ve mentioned- I wouldnt be able to do as part of a Catholic ceremony- but thankfully a lot of it in a Catholic ceremony isn’t too gendered! The vows are identical for both, there is apparently no such thing as being given away for Catholics as it undermines the importance of entering a marriage freely and CONSENT. (As soon as I found this out I was like wow Catholicism you arent always so conservative are you.. sometimes!) And there are apparently three different nuptial blessings that are legit- one of them is wonderful and not gendered at all and the other two are a bit like… good luck in your HOME WOMAN or WOMAN was made to help out the man y’all. So hopefully we can avoid those ones if the internet is to be believed. Also- wonderfully- my church randomly has TWO Aisles. So we’ll be able to walk down at precisely the same time and satisfy my partner’s need for symmetry.
    And of course post ceremony we will just totally be honest and true to ourselves in every aspect of everything to the most tiny detail.
    I love reading articles like this though. Sometimes I feel like I’m a bad feminist for still wanting my religion to be part of our lives- but sometimes to be an individual is to have many different cultural elements!

    • elizabeth mcmanus says:

      Wow, thanks for your awesome comment Katie! And HUGE congrats to you and your partner! Sounds like you two have planned an amazing ceremony that reflects you as people. And you are so right, being a feminist means containing those multitudes like religion that can bring out complicated, but important conversations. Best of luck!!

  2. Brita says:

    I’m a Christian feminist who married an atheist, so we definitely had to figure out how to balance everything. We had a tiny wedding with our parents and siblings only in the same chapel where my parents got married almost 30 years prior to my wedding. I wore a short white dress with hot pink accents. I’m the only daughter, so my dad did walk me down the aisle, but it was after my FIL and my mom walked down the aisle, and after my MIL walked my husband down the aisle. There was NO “giving away” language.

    This summer, I’m actually blogging weekly about our wedding planning process. Some of it is fairly predictable, like about our engagement photos, but this week’s post explains the thought process behind my engagement ring and our wedding bands, including my desire for ethical materials. Oh, and two weeks ago I wrote about how I pre-proposed to my husband. 😉

leave a response...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s