“The Children” are NOT Invisible: Why I Don’t Support the KONY 2012 Campaign.

I was first exposed to the conflict in Northern Uganda at the age of fourteen. My exposure was, as i have articulated many times, a radical uprooting of the doll’s house i had grown up in; my white privilege, American privilege, gender identity, and perception of self not only became salient to me, but i thrust such perceptions all under robust and ruthless scrutiny. Through interactions with women and men my age and older in Uganda returning from tragedy beyond articulation, i uncovered a passion for fighting for human rights for all peoples. But more importantly, this realization did not merely stem from shared or witnessed woe – it came from a shared human experience. My friends who live in Uganda are human beings, as flawed and beautiful and resilient and hopeful as you or i. I awoke then to a global community committed to human rights because we are all human, not out of pity.

However.

My exposure to the Ugandan conflict is a rare anomaly in the scope of international awareness. I was educated because i went to Uganda. In all honesty: i knew nothing about Uganda before i left; our trip was spent half in Uganda and half in Rwanda, and i was focusing all of my pre-departure energies on the latter. Thus, my education was first-hand and on-the-ground.

Not everyone has this blessing or opportunity. It is for this reason that i think much of what the organization Invisible Children does is fantastic. They are supremely good storytellers; as flawed as their methodology and approach may be, the team behind the documentaries and information dissemination do a brilliant job at communicating the importance of caring for people whom most of their donors and participants will never meet. They instill a dedicated passion for a cause that, in and of itself, does not threaten American security or comfort on an individual level really at all. In terms of introducing the Ugandan conflict to broader discourse especially among my peers across the country, Invisible Children is great.

Most importantly, i have no doubt that the people who are at present posting “KONY 2012” as their facebook statuses and writing checks to this NGO have the very best of intentions. In no way do i want to ever discredit the commitment one human being has made to another to see their full identity and fight for their basic, inalienable rights. This is a beautiful act.

But the “KONY 2012” campaign is not, in my opinion, the way to empower and actualize the full identity of an entire nation of peoples and victims of war.

The KONY 2012 campaign, for those who do not know, is the latest brainchild of Invisible Children, an organization based in the United States with a mission to end the conflict in Uganda and its repercussions across Central and East Africa. Spawned by a 27 minute video, this campaign seeks to promote awareness about the war crimes of Jospeh Kony, the leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, or LRA (the insurgency that initiated the civil unrest in Uganda and army that is responsible for abducting over 30,000 children and forcing them to be child soldiers and sex slaves) through a social media grounded guerilla art movement. This is to be manifested in the form of sharing, reblogging, tweeting, and posting “KONY 2012” on all forms of internet discourse with links to the Invisible Children website. Furthermore, the campaign is to come to a head in April when mobilizers are to “cover the night” by putting posters, pictures, and stickers of “KONY 2012” on every visible surface they can find.

At first glance, this intention is excellent. Of course i want people to be educated and aware about the gross injustices Kony has performed. Guerilla art? Count me in. Social media? I live in my computer – golden.

But promoting such awareness by glorifying a criminal, portraying this intervention as an American/white man’s burden to “help” Africa, and encouraging a militaristic intervention?

Absolutely not.

This conflict is far more complex than a mere facebook status can convey; frankly, it is more complicated than a thirty-minute video can explain either, particularly when 50% of said video is dedicated to why “YOU” must end the war, not what Ugandan leaders of independent grassroots movements, churches, mosques, and other bodies of change decree what needs doing. To end a war, we must confront injustice by empowering the people involved.

This means that the voices of “the children” must be heard far more than our own. I do not see this in the KONY 2012 video. In fact, the whole narrative begins with Jason Russell, one of the founders of Invisible Children, saying “my life was changed.”

Yes, it’s your narrative, Jason. Yes, please speak to what you know. But let’s all remember this is more than just one story – one story is an excellent place to start, but the truth resists simplicity.

The impact of the scene in both the original documentary and this video of Jacob mourning the loss of his brother is so. so powerful.  In many ways, i think everyone in the world should see this scene to understand the visceral sorrow that was – and remains to be – the war in Uganda. Woe is universally transcendent of language and border. But do not let this woe be all of Uganda that you see. All of the empowerment, of the celebration of human resilience in the face of adversity, were scenes filmed in America. In part i am sure this is because of resources, and yes, some of the people in America were Ugandans – but what of the people who live in Gulu town? What of their relief? Their self-actualization?

This depiction of Uganda – as children suffering from the horrific impacts of war – is an incomplete picture that is otherizing and portreying the conflict as something that “we,” in our American privilege, must swoop in and “fix.” In this reductive perspective, there is no space to love and seek to understand people complexly, because the war is all that we see.  And to paint this conflict in the eyes of the American public by creating a campaign of hatred towards Joseph Kony is not, as the film claims, subverting or changing the way the media portrays global challenges. It is totally buying into this idea that “the bad guys” are the face of war – and it furthers this concept of Uganda as a nation broken and in need of “the good guys” (meaning Americans) to save “them” from Kony.

Furthermore, by putting Kony’s face as the face of the conflict, we are glorifying violence and his crimes against humanity. But more importantly – and i will fully disclose this to be a reflection of my own belief in nonviolence as a way of life – there leaves no room for forgiveness. I am not alone in thinking that Kony should not be put to death, and that this action would not heal the wounds this war has scarred us all with. Calling for the ICC to step in is fine, but integral to rebuilding a country torn apart by war is an element of forgiveness (which is different from forgetting – and doesn’t mean there is not an element of accountability for crimes committed). And this act is not for those who did not live through the war to decide the fate of – not me, not Invisible Children. Forgiveness must come from those who need it, and those who need to give it.

And this doesn’t even begin to cover the disparities within the Ugandan military in terms of accountability and real peacemaking. Grant Oyston, a sociologist and proprietor of the Visible Children Tumblr, does a superb job in this article of describing why a military-driven intervention in Uganda is not the best solution. He describes the problems with a military-driven mindset, for all past military interventions have failed and caused violent retaliation by the LRA. I highly encourage you to read the entire piece – but if you take only one thing away from it, please take this:

“Military intervention may or may not be the right idea, but people supporting KONY 2012 probably don’t realize they’re supporting the Ugandan military who are themselves raping and looting away. If people know this and still support Invisible Children because they feel it’s the best solution based on their knowledge and research, I have no issue with that. But I don’t think most people are in that position, and that’s a problem.

Is awareness good? Yes. But these problems are highly complex, not one-dimensional and, frankly, aren’t of the nature that can be solved by postering, film-making and changing your Facebook profile picture, as hard as that is to swallow. Giving your money and public support to Invisible Children so they can spend it on supporting ill-advised violent intervention and movie #12 isn’t helping. Do I have a better answer? No, I don’t, but that doesn’t mean that you should support KONY 2012 just because it’s something. Something isn’t always better than nothing. Sometimes it’s worse.”

Good intentions are good. But they are not enough.

I want to reiterate once more i don’t think ill of anyone who has reblogged or posted or stamped KONY 2012 to their foreheads – your compassion is never to be understated. Thank you for caring. Selfishly, Uganda is a very special place to me and seeing so many people taking public stances for human rights in a country i love so much is moving, moving in ways i cannot describe. I am not telling or asking you to stop caring or to stop being involved with social change. I am asking you do so in an informed way that imagines and seeks to understand this conflict complexly, and in a manner that acknowledges our stance as allies in a global community of agents of change. Empower yourselves!

And, should you want a documentary to dive deeper into the complexity, might i direct you to the brilliant, Oscar-nominated masterpiece that is WAR/DANCE. You will not regret it; there is no narration on the part of the documentarian, and juxtaposed to unbridled woe that is war is uncontainable hope and resilience and pure human-ness.

Let us all work to imagine peace in its complexity.

**EDIT: Invisible Children has since put out a counter-blog to some of these criticisms and many others. I encourage you to read their side as well! Thank you for your thoughts!

**ALSO AN EDIT: There is now a PART II to this post, viewable by clicking here! Thanks! 

*** I HIGHLY RECOMMEND YOU WATCH THIS. This is the best response i’ve yet come across.

current jam: “vienna” billy joel.

best thing in my life right now: going to les mis tonight!

Advertisements

32 thoughts on ““The Children” are NOT Invisible: Why I Don’t Support the KONY 2012 Campaign.

  1. mary says:

    Wow. What a well-thought post. I’ve seen the hype, but had not yet watched the video. Thank you for your insights here. I especially loved this thought:
    “Calling for the ICC to step in is fine, but integral to rebuilding a country torn apart by war is an element of forgiveness (which is different from forgetting).”

  2. Ian W says:

    hey lizzie. great post! definitely definitely sums up what i think a lot of people are thinking. just to add on to your idea of the ICC and forgiveness. a lot of people actually argue that the ICC’s issue of a warrant of arrest in 2005 was a huge detriment to the peace process in that it deterred kony from wanting to continue the peace talks for fear that he wouldn’t be given a fair trial. furthermore, if you speak to most northern ugandans they will tell you that they are far less interested in punitive punishment and more interested in reconciliation and forgiveness, something i believe invisible children completely fails to talk about

    • lizzie mcmizzie says:

      i so agree! i actually had a paragraph in here originally on my experiences in northern uganda with other grassroots groups seeking non-punitive solutions for kony, but it wasn’t flowing right so i took it out. regardless, thank you for bringing it up – your kind words and excellent insights are most appreciated! 🙂

  3. Stephanie Rogers says:

    This is an amazing and articulate post. Thank you for sharing your own perspective and helping us to see a different side of the situation in Africa. Both your writing style and the content of what you said really resonated with me.

  4. Damian Scott says:

    I take on your points and reasons but really you are in no more of position than Jason to say what it is exactly that the Ugandans want. He is at least trying to urge some further action. I resent the fact that you state that he is exploiting a friendship and a cause. Have you spoken to Jacob? Have you discussed his friendship with Jason and how he feels about the entire Kony 2012 project and the hope that it has inspired in him? Nothing else has worked. This is a plea to further the action against Kony and to further make known the action that needs to be taken against Kony. No one has called for Kony’s head, only justice. Jason has worked on this project for some time, this is no flash-in-the-pan cause. He has clearly worked in conjunction with Ugandan officials, with Ugandan people and with the ICC. As stated in the video the US troops deployed have not ‘invaded’ Uganda but have been lent to help the Ugandan military deal with the situation. This may also entail the US military keeping a check on the Ugandan military and helping to sort out the rough-goings and any abuse of power. I believe that Kony 2012 is a bold and exciting move that has marked the beginning of a united world, the world as one. These ‘kids’ who have donated time and money do not only see only the woe of Uganda, if they did I doubt that they would help. They see the hope and the similarities that they share with the Ugandan people and the fact that although we are oceans apart we must all work together to keep this world afloat. I respect the fact that you have taken a critical eye to this cause, it is something that is definitely needed, but I urge to do it constructively rather than condemn this good-hearted and ambitious project entirely.

    • lizzie mcmizzie says:

      Damian,

      Thank you for your insights and thoughts; they are truly, genuinely, appreciated. I wish only to clarify one thing: i am not condemning the cause of Kony 2012, the people involved, or the intent behind it. As stated above, i think these intentions and movements toward a global community are both indescribably important and not to be discouraged. I love that Invisible Children is urging further action – again, i don’t think they are a whole-heartedly “terrible” organization. In fact, i think much of what they do is excellent; they make relevant to millions of people a life they have never lived. That’s an enormous undertaking. However, i do feel as though the film is only presenting one side of the conflict. At risk of sounding incredibly pretentious, i have worked in Uganda with many grassroots leaders in the struggle against Kony. This does not make me an expert, but it has given me some insight into the gaps in the IC mission. Most of the Ugandans whom i know – which is not a voice for all of Uganda, but a voice nonetheless – don’t want military involvement on any level. These are people whom i also know the IC guys sought to interview, but declined because they did not want to be part of this slanted vision.

      I have immense respect for Jason’s dedication and his friendship with Jacob. I may not agree to his methodology, but i *do* respect the cause. I very much hope you and i can continue these kinds of conversations in our work to build a global community together that universally seeks to end oppression and injustice in all its forms.
      Best,
      lizzie

      • Jim says:

        1st, “But promoting such awareness by glorifying a criminal, portraying this intervention as an American/white man’s burden to “help” Africa, and encouraging a militaristic intervention?”

        So yeah, I can see where I misquoted there, but you get where I’m coming from.

        2nd, Kony has a dictatorial rule of his army. This is what meant by dictator.

        I understand where you’re coming from with the ideal of a nonviolent end to Kony’s crimes, but I’m not sure how Kony is supposed to face accountability without violence.

        I can’t determine the authenticity, but the video shows a statement where Kony himself admits that what he has done so far was motivated by nothing more than control. If this is true, than he’s not going to hand over control of his army or himself, unless the only alternative is even more undesirable. People who can do what he has, are incapable of empathy and simply can’t be reasoned with. The fact that he destroys lives for nothing more than control, proves that the control he has is more valuable to him than human life itself; and If human life is less valuable to him than control, what could possibly be done to convince him to give that control up? He would have to be forced into a corner where handing over control is literally his only option; and even then, he would be likely to kill himself in order to control the way in which his reign of terror ends.

        The danger is that if he has to time to plan how to respond in this “last stand” type situation, he will more than likely destroy himself, and as much as possible around him. Basically what the R.U.F. did during it’s retreat.

        Forceful suppression may be the only option. Not as a vengeful act, but as a preventative measure for the safety of those who have yet to be directly effected by this man.

        Forgiveness is a must, but it may have to accompany the mans death in stead of replace it.

        If an arrest is attempted, Kony will more than likely resist with violence, and his one life may have to be taken, in order to keep a larger number of people alive. I compared this to a math problem before.

        The ideal goal would be to prevent the loss of any more lives, but at this point the realistic goal would be to expect deaths, and try to keep the body count to a minimum. Kony’s death would not a be a glorious moment, but it’s more appealing than a situation where even more lives are lost in addition to his own.

        Also, after reading my first comment, I feel a came across very abrasively, and apologize if it felt that way to you as well. I get very strong feelings about subjects like this, and can sometimes express my ideas without taking the time to make sure they are presented properly.

        Best to you as well.

  5. Jim says:

    I can’t help but think that it’s a bit unrealistic to expect the film maker to fully represent the Ugandan people in a video that’s not about Uganda in the first place. The video is about Kony, gaining support for an NGO, and getting rid of an organization that kidnaps and kills people. The video doesn’t represent the Ugandans as a people, country, culture, or anything else because *that’s not it’s goal*. The video representing the *victims* of Joseph Kony. As far as the video implying that it’s the “white man’s” problem to swoop in and save the “helpless” Ugandan people, or that any action against Kony other than arrest is implied; The most I can figure is that this must be a matter of personal interpretation. What I got from the video is, “Somethings going down, here’s what it is, here’s who’s behind a lot of it, and these are things you can do to help end the problem.”

    I can empathize with your feelings about the way Jason self promotes in the video, but that’s a problem to have with Jason, not the video or the organization behind it. Plus, who’s to assume that Jason meant to portray himself the way it came across in the video in the first place? Secondly, people in the U.S. aren’t being called in to save the day, just to support the Ugandan government’s *capture of Kony*. No guns. No bombs. In stead, the group wanted the equipment and training to *find and capture* Kony. You see military action, I see an arrest. And really, If you feel that there is any solution to stopping Kony that doesn’t result in his arrest, at the very least, I’d love to hear how someone that kills thousands of people for no reason but power is supposed to be convinced to just not do it anymore, and retire from mass murder or something.

    TL;DR 1) The people in the video represent victims of a psychopath; not the Ugandans, or their culture, as a whole. 2) The video doesn’t seem to support any “military action”, it in stead pushes support in Kony’s arrest. That’s arrest, not death. 3) “White people’s problem?” Really? Keep trolling. 4) There’s a reason you yourself admit that you can’t offer a “better solution”, and here’s what it is; you can’t slap the wrist of a militant dictator and put him in the corner for time out. In stead of “peace”, he may very well have to rot in a jail cell, or even be executed. Sorry for the reality check, but that’s what happens when you kill or kidnap thousands of people.

    • lizzie mcmizzie says:

      Jim,

      Thank you for your thoughts and insight. They are genuinely appreciated – criticism keeps me growing! I wanted to address just a few things you mentioned above and perhaps clarify or rebut some key points. I hope this is just the beginning of a meaningful discourse in active global awareness!

      First, in instigating a national/international movement to “bring Kony to justice” there is, inherently, a belief that what is portrayed is a full picture. Or, at least a full enough picture to start marching on Washington. And please don’t get me wrong: i am 100% in favor of (a) holding Kony accountable for the destruction he has wrong, (b) Americans and Ugandans mobilizing for change, and (c) empowering ourselves to empower others. But there are two key contentions i have with what you said: first, peace does not mean not holding Kony accountable – but in my experience with NGOs and grassroots communities in Uganda (which is not to say i can speak for them or for all of Uganda) military action is not what is widely desired. And i know action is not warfare – that’s why i used the words “involvement” or “action.” Secondly, accountability when not done through execution is not a slap on a wrist; it opens the door for true healing in my personal opinion. To fight with violence with violence is, as Mahatma Gandhi once said, to make “the whole world blind.” In no way do i think Kony is right or good or meant to be venerated.

      Lastly, Kony is not a dictator, he is a rebel leader; and i never said “white people’s problems.” I discussed my white privilege in a manner by which i hoped to illuminate deeper currents in the NGO world and post-colonial discourse.

      Again, thank you for your thoughts! Don’t forget to be awesome!

      Best,
      lizzie

      • Jim says:

        1st, “But promoting such awareness by glorifying a criminal, portraying this intervention as an American/white man’s burden to “help” Africa, and encouraging a militaristic intervention?”

        So yeah, I can see where I misquoted there, but you get where I’m coming from.

        2nd, Kony has a dictatorial rule of his army. This is what meant by dictator.

        I understand where you’re coming from with the ideal of a nonviolent end to Kony’s crimes, but I’m not sure how Kony is supposed to face accountability without violence.

        I can’t determine the authenticity, but the video shows a statement where Kony himself admits that what he has done so far was motivated by nothing more than control. If this is true, than he’s not going to hand over control of his army or himself, unless the only alternative is even more undesirable. People who can do what he has, are incapable of empathy and simply can’t be reasoned with. The fact that he destroys lives for nothing more than control, proves that the control he has is more valuable to him than human life itself; and If human life is less valuable to him than control, what could possibly be done to convince him to give that control up? He would have to be forced into a corner where handing over control is literally his only option; and even then, he would be likely to kill himself in order to control the way in which his reign of terror ends.

        The danger is that if he has to time to plan how to respond in this “last stand” type situation, he will more than likely destroy himself, and as much as possible around him. Basically what the R.U.F. did during it’s retreat.

        Forceful suppression may be the only option. Not as a vengeful act, but as a preventative measure for the safety of those who have yet to be directly effected by this man.

        Forgiveness is a must, but it may have to accompany the mans death in stead of replace it.

        If an arrest is attempted, Kony will more than likely resist with violence, and his one life may have to be taken, in order to keep a larger number of people alive. I compared this to a math problem before.

        The ideal goal would be to prevent the loss of any more lives, but at this point the realistic goal would be to expect deaths, and try to keep the body count to a minimum. Kony’s death would not a be a glorious moment, but it’s more appealing than a situation where even more lives are lost in addition to his own.

        Also, after reading my first comment, I feel a came across very abrasively, and apologize if it felt that way to you as well. I get very strong feelings about subjects like this, and can sometimes express my ideas without taking the time to make sure they are presented properly.

        Best to you as well.

        P.S. I just realized that I posted this as a reply in the wrong comment the first time. Sorry about that. I’m having an off day.

      • lizzie mcmizzie says:

        Jim,

        Again, i really appreciate your insight. Paralleling Kony’s actions to R.U.F. is fascinating, and i must confess i know very little of Sierra Leone to truly add anything to this idea. But i do stand by my assesment that violence only breeds more violence – yet i freely confess i don’t know what the best course of action to take is.

        However, i also feel that it’s not really my place to decide, either (not that anyone is asking me to, but just to think in esoteric terms). It’s up to the people of Uganda – not the US government, and really only the Ugandan government if the voice of the people is being heard. I don’t mean this as a shouldering off of blame, but in an effort to turn to someone who knows and understands this situation far better than i (or, in this case, many many someones).

        And as to the “white man’s burden” comment: this is a reference to post-colonial theory that is based on, if i am thinking correctly, a Rudyard Kipling poem about how it is the “white man’s job” to “save the savages.” It’s brash, i freely acknowledge, but that’s why i juxtaposed the idea with all the good things IC have done. There is a definite moralistic tone to what they do that doesn’t sit well with me; the fact that they think the Us government should intervene and not Ugandan based and founded groups illustrates this for me. I’m more interested in a model that empowers Ugandans through increasing access to resources and capacity rather than using our own forces. In some ways, this is what the US deployment of advisors is doing – but as i don’t want a military solution (for what its worth, again, most of my Ugandan friends don’t either – not all of Uganda, but people whom i know) i think this is an example of the best of intentions gone awry.

        May your day turn brighter! No worries about “off”-ness – we’re all human beings here!

        Best,
        lizzie

  6. Hannah McManus says:

    wow, this is a great night to be proud of all three of my children. caring is hard. forgiving and calling others to fogive and to love is even harder. well said, miss blogger.

  7. Elena D'Amico says:

    While I have never visited Uganda, and experienced many of the things you did, your post has been one of the ones that I’ve agreed with the most, and has explained how I’ve felt the last day-and-a-half more eloquently than I could ever put it. I retweeted a few tweets from Shawn Ahmed (Uncultured Project) earlier tonight in which he gives many similar opinions, while also talking about the money/accountability issues. He was giving advice to a friend and said “Don’t support a charity that perpetuates either guilt or the notion that white foreigners need to save powerless Africans. Don’t donate to a charity where $3 of every $100 goes JUST to pay the salaries of the co-founders. Let alone other staff. If you want to support advocacy & political action, choose a charity with a respected record.” While the cultural issues are so extremely important, the money issues still bothered me. Maybe it’s because I’m an accounting major, but to think IC hasn’t had an independent external audit in years really bothers me, while I know it’s costly charities and non-profits (almost more so than other organizations given the work they do) need to be audited regularly to help keep everything on the up and up. So many people don’t do any research into a cause or organization, if people made an informed (in their opinion) decision to support the Kony 2012 campaign I wouldn’t be so annoyed, but the majority of the support has been people jumping on a bandwagon. Even friends of mine who are political science majors just started posting on everyone’s walls to watch the video and “Make Kony famous”. I’ve been so angry with smart people acting so … not stupid, but without informing themselves, so I was extremely excited to read a very well thought out, educated, and experienced view from another university student.

    Now if only every person on youtube stopped commenting about it, I’ll be able to let go of much of my anger much faster.

    Thanks for not forgetting to be awesome.

    • lizzie mcmizzie says:

      Thank YOU, Elena, for your kind words! I agree with everything you said about monetary accountability and informing yourself before you support a cause. You’re made of awesome, and i’m glad we can fight this worldsuck together!

      Best,
      lizzie

  8. Morgan says:

    I’ve been so disappointed with every side through all this hype. The people who mindlessly reblog something because they think it will make a difference, the ones who are so quick to condemn the rebloggers for being mis-informed, the ones who condemn the video for being propaganda while they link to a tumblr post that uses mis-information to invalidate the movement, and the ones who condemn everyone else for not having 18 hours of free time a day to scour every financial report of every non profit organization ever.

    That being said, I think your criticisms are completely valid. It’s frustrating seeing human beings portrayed as merely objects of pity. Dehumanizing people by showing only one aspect of their experience is wrong. Unfortunately, those are the tactics that work to bring in donors and raise awareness.

    By the way, I thought I would share IC’s response to the visiblechildren blog

    • lizzie mcmizzie says:

      Thank you, Morgan! I so agree- that’s why i tried to make it clear i don’t fault people for being misinformed. This is a conversation starter, and i think we all do well to remember conversations are most fruitful when we’re kind to one another.

      And thanks for that link! Will add that in now!

  9. Inika says:

    Very well written. You vocalized every thought that ran through my brain, but that I had a hard time articulating. Thank you!

  10. Sad Angel says:

    yes but you also must realize is how u have to go about these things these days there are many closed doors when it comes to what people will support and why….there is also a big generation gap that u always have to find a way to bridge..me been a person who has to live and support a non profit organization is always hitting a big wall. I’m not saying I’m for war or killing or what ever but there is only so much u can do till the people or the government makes u come to a complete stop. And they have done so with many good or bad causes for many years nd a lot of the time its because they want to be ignorant so what many human non profits have to do is push and pull or bring something out that goes bam! right in peoples faces or no one will care one iota ..that is the world we live in today and i dont think from what ive personally experienced and seen that it is ever going to change u have to bam it in peoples faces or else it will just have a little vail on it. and as for kony…may he rot for all i care for him…

    • lizzie mcmizzie says:

      Thank you for your thoughts! I do agree, sometimes an amount of shock value is necessary to get people to pay attention; i just want to say don’t let the shock value be all we see! Don’t forget to be awesome 🙂

  11. people just want to help says:

    you come across as being holier-than-thou. just because you’ve been to uganda doesnt give justification for you to be on your high horse. just think about the fact that a lot of kids on facebook don’t really know a way to help besides reposting something or liking something. all of their intentions are good–their hearts seem much more willing to help than yours seems from this post. also your arguments are shaky and weak–you have no backbone and go back and forth.

    • lizzie mcmizzie says:

      Thank you for your comments! I apologize if i come across as holier-than-thou; in no way do i think i am expert (thus, a response post can be found here where i try to make that quite plain). Also, as i stated above, i don’t think the people putting KONY 2012 as their facebook statuses are bad – i make very clear that the best of intentions are never to be understated. It is, i believe, an excellent place to start a broader conversation. I am trying to encourage us all, though, to dig deeper- myself included.

      Have a beautiful day!
      Best,
      lizzie

  12. Maria says:

    I think from most blog posts that I’ve seen from people who don’t support KONY2012 is that the biggest point made is to fix the country as a whole and while I agree that it should be fixed as a whole, does that mean that we can’t do something on a minor scale? Maybe these crimes have gone on so long because, as much as it sucks to say it, it’s become a way of life.
    Can we not offer these people hope. Can we not let them see that others care about them and maybe ignite something inside of them that will make them not want to live like this?
    Do we just let another 20 years pass by??

    • lizzie mcmizzie says:

      Maria,
      Thank you for your comments and taking the time to read this! I genuinely appreciate your insight. To address a few things that you said – i don’t think “we” should “fix” the entire country of Uganda; i think Ugandans have been working to empower and enable themselves far longer than IC to build stronger communities and address governmental corruption. The hope we can offer is by standing in solidarity with a hope that already exists – to say that all Ugandans are hopeless is reductive and akin to saying all Americans (or Norwegians, or Canadians, take your pick!) are hopeful. I am in full agreement that we should NOT let 20 years go by of inaction – not at all. My challenge is to what kind of action to take. Is buying a bracelet really going to subvert a system of corruption and oppression? Sure, this video is a first step to more education and informed advocacy, but i am a believer in sending money to organizations that are, to employ the cliché, “of the people and for the people.” IC is a good first step; the rest, in my opinion (which feel free to take with a grain of salt!) lies with grassroots movements with more longevity and cultural understanding in Uganda. Should you want a good place to start, i recommend here: http://www.ccyauganda.org/

      Best to you! Hope you’re having a beautiful day.
      lizzie

leave a response...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s