The Fault in Our Stars: Revisited.

From the open love letters i have composed so frequently to the writings rendered by John Green, it is no secret i am a fervent member of his cult of nerdfighters follower of his philosophies. My admiration from him stems from both his body of work as one half of the vlogbrothers with his hilarious and vivacious brother, Hank Green, and more deeply from his written artistry manifested in his novels. My favorite was, until recently, Looking for Alaska.*

In January, i had the beautiful opportunity to see John and Hank speak as part of the tour for the release of John’s latest book, The Fault in Our Stars. John said then – and has reiterated in many of his videos – that this was the book he had been writing for us for over ten years. His use of the phrase “writing for you” alone already was enough to fill me with unbridled anticipation to read it; knowing he had, in fact, written it for us made me beside myself. Having read almost everything he’d published prior to this, i knew that such longevity spent with his words must have made a masterpiece of them.

It did.

When i reflected on meeting John here, on Wandering Writes, i devoted my energy to thinking about the meaning of meeting your heroes. John Green is, in every sense of the word, what i believe to be a contemporary philosopher. He is utterly human in his admitted flaws and yet afflicted with the imperial sense of cosmic chaos and meaning indelible to those of Great Minds. I said then, and i think it bears repeating, that i don’t mean to idealize him (i think he would be genuinely worried to hear someone call him perfect) but i do believe he is an incredible voice in a generation in need of incredible leaders. Meeting him was humbling and human.

All this, before i had even so much as cracked open the spine of the book for which the tour had been commenced. In a multitude of facets, i am profoundly grateful for this; i was a blubbering, molasses-on-my-tongue fool enough having only read his previous works. Reading the culmination of his genius thus far was riveting enough to have reduced me to an absolute puddle in such circumstances.

Without betraying anything key to the plot or characters, i will say this: The Fault in Our Stars broke me down and patched me up in the way childhood once felt. The complexity of human existence amidst the disillusionment that comes with growing older seemed to, bizarrely, crumble while my hands were wrapped about the cover and my attention engulfed in the story. Reading the story, i simply was. Infinity was tangible. Then, of course, i finished the book and all the uprooting-to-my-core emotions suspended for the sake of being able to see the words on the page came pouring out. My stomach, i realized, had been clenched in a knot so tight i hardly breathed the whole book through. It was as if, for those twenty-four hours i spent in various curled-up positions engrossed in the book, i was no one. A human swept up in a story.

And then, with the closing of the last page, reality hit, and so did the beauty and destruction of the story. I know this sounds like the stuff of creative writing professorial nightmares – phrases plagued with sweeping statements that would make even Nathanial Hawthorne cower in vocabular fear – but i am being as genuine as i can be. This book went from being a work of art – a lie telling the truth – to lived reality. The truth unveiled consumed me.

I didn’t write up my reflections here, for i wanted to hold on to them for a while. Let the swirl of whisked-up sadness and truth and cosmic chaos brood. I’m still not done processing (i don’t think anyone really ever can be) and even these very words are only hands run along the top of the water. They aren’t plunged in, enveloped.

Such an experience belongs to the reader. And while my own torrents of comprehension are still in need of hashing out, i don’t think i want to do that all here. Not for lack of love for you, but rather because i want to give you the gift of reading the book yourself, making your own claims and dissensions and celebrations. For this reason, on the official first birthday of Wandering Writes (this approaching Saturday, the 25th) the last prize to be given away will be nothing other than a signed copy of John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars:

This is not, of course, the copy that he himself personalized for me; it is unread by myself and waiting for someone to drink in its wisdom and folly. May it find a loving home with you, whomever you may be.

For today and tomorrow, though, the giveaway will continue to be nine “nerdy and i know it” postcards (with the bonus tenth one from my globetrotting collection!). Rules and such are here!

Comment Question: What book fills you with inexplicable zeal or passion or longing?

Yesterday’s Winner: Kenzie for tweeting the link to the blog! Congrats, Kenzie! (sorry for the delay! The internet on campus went down last night!)

current jam: “permafrost” laurena segura

best thing in my life right now: the mountain goats.

*If these names are ringing in empty ears (that is to say, you have no freaking clue what i’m talking about) might i direct you to this video. Welcome. DFTBA.

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20 thoughts on “The Fault in Our Stars: Revisited.

  1. Kate Farley says:

    I can’t pick just one book, that’s cruel. But, since we were talking about it briefly yesterday, I am reminded of Catcher in the Rye

    -Kate Farley

  2. abbeybookproject says:

    Hello! First of all, I just read a bunch of your posts, and I love your blog! I just finished The Fault in Our Stars as well and I thought it was amazing. I also think that your contest is pretty cool, so I shall answer the question 🙂 I would have to say The Great Gatsby. I love the setting. Also, the characters seem so real and they are so deep. There is so much emotion in the story, I felt like I was there through the whole journey. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s writing just makes the story that much better. That book left a very interesting ‘taste in my brain’ and I love when that happens.

    • lizzie mcmizzie says:

      Thank you for the kind words! And i so agree – The Great Gatsby is easily one of the most profound and beautiful works i’ve ever read. Gotta love John Green’s commentary on it too! 🙂

  3. Ardie Collins says:

    I know I’m late on the competition front for this blog post, but I just wanted to say how excellently I think you described the feeling of reading this book. I was just utterly engrossed throughout. I am a relatively new arrival to Nerdfighteria, I suppose, and so TFioS was actually the first John Green book I have read, and I think I can see what all the fuss was about! His ability to discuss such grand ideas in a down-to-earth, accessible and humorous way is what makes his writing so great. And it really did feel like he had written it for us. Great post! DFTBA.

    • lizzie mcmizzie says:

      I’ll still count this as a competition entry, Ardie! 🙂
      And thank you for such kind words – i felt the same way after listening to your song about TFiOS. Glad to know you’ve found nerdfighteria! It took me a while to read John’s books (i only first read Looking for Alaska about a year ago) but i think it’s safe to say this is his best. DFTBA!

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